“For ||thus|| saith he that is high and lifted up—
Inhabiting futurity、
And ||holy|| is his name:
<A high and holy place> will I inhabit,
Also with the crushed and lowly in spirit,
To revive the spirit of the lowly, and
To revive the heart of them who are crushed;— ”
https://ref.ly/Is57.15;emphbbl

There is an amazing juxtaposition in this verse between God and what Isaiah calls “the lowly.”  Here God is the “high and lifted up” one, the one who inhabits futurity [or eternity].  This God is called holy.  Now, if we didn’t know better, we would assume that this God would be too busy with other things to worry about the lowly.  He is great and powerful and holy and lifted up, so doesn’t he spend his time with the powerful and wealthy?  Does he have any time at all for those who are poor and oppressed and hurting?

The funny thing is, he certainly does, indeed he goes out of his way to assure us that his heart and mind and strength and power are committed to “the crushed and lowly in spirit.”  He wants the lowly to live and those who are crushed he wants to bring to life and sustain and comfort.

What does God get from this?  Nothing from the lowly, they don’t have anything at all to offer except their own crushed and broken spirit.  The funny thing is, this seems to be exactly what God is after.  He calls the broken to himself and comforts them.  Jesus will put it this way:

“Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.”
https://ref.ly/Mt11.28-29;esv

Doesn’t Jesus in Matthew sound a lot like God in Isaiah?

 

 

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