Archives for posts with tag: esv study bible

Jeremiah 8:22 (HCSB)
Is there no balm in Gilead?
Is there no physician there?
So why has the healing of my dear people
not come about?

There was, of course, balm in Gilead.  While biblical commentators don’t know exactly what this balm consisted of, it is clear that it was used for medicinal purposes.  The people of Judah complain that they are in desperate straits and that God has not saved them.  God’s answer is that the remedy has been there all along–faithfulness to him.  There is balm available; there is healing available.

Instead of faithfulness to the covenant, the people pursued God and other gods.  They were performing the rituals that God had commanded, all the while also offering sacrifices to false gods of the nations surrounding them.  Needless to say, this was not acceptable to our God.  This was idolatry.  God treats idolatry very harshly and if he is that concerned about it, we ought to be that concerned also.

The ESV Study Bible comments: “They prefer false prophets to God’s written and revealed word.”

We ought to be considering the lessons of Jeremiah’s Judah very carefully, because we live in a culture in which, as followers of Jesus, we are allowing ourselves to become ensnared by the cultural trends around us, many of which are diametrically opposed to faithfulness to God.  We believe it’s okay because we are also devoted to God.  This is not okay.  Not at all.

God will fight against our flagging devotion to him, even when we do not want him to.  This is an act of love.

 

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“But Zion said, “The Lord has forsaken me;
my Lord has forgotten me.”
“Can a woman forget her nursing child,
that she should have no compassion on the son of her womb?
Even these may forget,
yet I will not forget you. ”
https://ref.ly/Is49.14-15;esv

  • The Problem: God’s people were afraid that God had forsaken them. This is a lament and it is set forth in honesty and despair.  Will God forsake his people?  Has he forsaken them?  It’s an all too common issue and anyone who has read a missionary biography or understands church history knows that this is an issue that comes up again and again. God, for purposes that we don’t fully understand, seems to appear to abandon his own people from time to time, to danger and difficulty.  Israel was going to be judged for her idolatry, would God abandon his people forever?
  • The Response from God:  I will not forget you. God’s response is given in a solemn promise and both God’s character and history itself demonstrate that what God promises here is true and he will do it.  He will not forget his people. The ESV Study Bible entitles this section: “Human despair is more than offset by divine grace.”

    Sit back in your chair and breathe in that truth for a minute.  God will not forget his people. This is his promise.  This is his oath. This is his character.  Kings will not cause him to abandon his promise. Time will not cause him to abandon his people.  Opposition, danger, and difficulty are hand maidens to our sovereign God and no more stand in the way of his promise here than a bunny rabbit could block an elephant.  God has done what he promised in the past; he will do what he has promised in the future.  He will not forget his own people.

 

And I will leave in your midst a people afflicted and poor, and they shall take refuge in the name of Yahweh.” (Zephaniah 3:12, LEB)

The Lord promises to bring judgment on the people of Judah because they were unfaithful to him, but in the midst of this judgment, there is a proclamation of mercy.  The Lord “will leave in your midst a people afflicted and poor,” however, this people will be different from the people who have been arrogant and unfaithful, they will “take refuge in the name of Yahweh.”

The ESV Study Bible says here:

God will especially provide a place for the humble and lowly (2:3) who, unlike the arrogant (3:11), know that they are in need. They not only call on God’s name (v. 9) but also seek refuge in his name (see the same term in Isa. 57:13; Nah. 1:7).

It would behoove we who follow the Lord in our own day and time to pay particular attention to remaining faithful to him despite the pressure from the broader culture and even some so-called followers of God who would have us compromise and act unfaithfully.  God can and often does bring severe mercy, but far better to never stray from him in the first place.